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Pump Troubleshooting

Pump Hums but Will Not Push Water

Possible Causes:

Impeller may be seized by debris.

Remove pump from skimmer and inspect the pump intake to ensure there is no debris restricting the impeller. Remove any debris, such as rocks that may become lodged around and above the impeller.

While the pump is out of the skimmer, lay it on its side and plug it in. Inspect to see if impeller spins. If impeller does not spin, use a screwdriver or small tool to try to “kick start” the impeller, NEVER USE YOUR FINGERS OR ANY OTHER BODY PART.

Pump may be air locked.

Impeller chamber must be flooded with water. Tilt pump while submerged in order to allow air to be released from the chamber or remove the pump from the skimmer and re-install, ensuring impeller chamber is flooded.

Pump is Pushing Very Little Water.

Possible Causes:

Plumbing clogged with debris.

Remove check valve connection from pipe. This will allow the BIOFALLS and plumbing to drain. Clogged debris may back flush out of the plumbing during this procedure. Inspect check valve to make sure no debris is lodged inside.

Remove pump from skimmer and inspect the pump intake to ensure there is no debris restricting the impeller. Remove any debris, such as rocks that may become lodged around and above impeller. Once completed, reinstall the pump and plug pump back into the GFI protected outlet.

Pump Will Not Operate

Possible Causes:

Poor electrical connection, tripped breaker, blown fuse, or other interruption in the power supply.

Check to ensure all electrical connections are working. Ensure a qualified electrician installed and tested electrical supply to your pond. Long extension cords may cause voltage drop at the pump, causing the amps to rise above the maximum level. This can cause a breaker to flip or the pump to heat up and burn the motor out. Note: Pumps damaged due to improper electrical connection are not covered under warranty.

For more useful information, see Common Reasons for a GFCI to Trip.

Pump Operates Intermittently

Possible Causes:

Not enough water in the pond.

The lowest pond must be designed large enough to supply enough water to start the circulation of the stream and waterfall. Once the pump is started, it may be necessary to add a few inches of water to the pond in order to account for the water used to feed the stream and waterfalls. Upper pools and “check” dams in the streams are also very effective in holding water upstream when the pump is not operating. Ponds designed too small may not be able to supply enough water to start the stream and waterfalls. This will cause the water in the pond to drop below the opening of the skimmer upon initial start-up and starve the pump of water.

Pond is too small for upper stream.

TThe lowest pond must be designed large enough to supply enough water to start the circulation of the stream and waterfall. Once the pump is started, it may be necessary to add a few inches of water to the pond in order to account for the water used to feed the stream and waterfalls. Upper pools and “check” dams in the streams are also very effective in holding water upstream when the pump is not operating. Ponds designed too small may not be able to supply enough water to start the stream and waterfalls. This will cause the water in the pond to drop below the opening of the skimmer upon initial start-up and starve the pump of water.

These are all examples of external factors that can cause a pump to function improperly. If you have troubleshooted your pump thoroughly and cannot find an external cause for the malfunction, the pump itself may have a problem. The pump could possibly then be up for warranty replacement, depending on the failure and pump age. If you are having problems with your pump and none of the solutions on this page solved your problem, please call or email us for more pump information or details on warranty returns.